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Mabel – Don’t Call Me Up

Mabel has shared her emphatic new pop banger ‘Don’t Call Me Up’. It’s been a remarkable 12 months for the pop riser, gaining more than half a billion streams and ending 2018 with a sold out UK tour. Packing out London’s Brixton Academy, Mabel seemed to have the world at her feet, entering the New Year with a nomination for British Breakthrough Act at the Brit Awards 2019.

Lyrically new single ‘Don’t Call Me Up’ is a middle finger to a possessive ex, a declaration of independence committed against a flouro-soaked trop-pop background. It’s much more than that, though, with Mabel’s surging vocal, and the addictive, nuanced songwriting, combining to provide perhaps her most potent pop moment yet.

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Poppy Ajudha – White Water (Live)

London’s extraordinary Poppy Ajudha has shared new single ‘White Water’ – tune in now.

Playing a show at North London’s Jazz Cafe that same evening, these are bold times for the songwriter, whose deft fusion of jazz and neo-soul is rendered in a highly personal style.

New song ‘White Water’ is online now, and it explores facets of the immigrant experience, the manner in which they are often forced to strip back aspects of their own heritage and identity to fit in with Western culture.

Poppy explains: “They are taught that this is the only way they will be accepted and while doing so the bar is set higher each time, disabling them from ever being able to keep their heads above water…”

Of course, the musicality of ‘White Water’ is just as rich as Poppy’s previous work; the rhythmic flurries echo broken beat, while her surging, impassioned vocal retains that velvet edge.

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Architects- Modern Misery

“Modern Misery”, the new video from U.K. metallers ARCHITECTS, can be seen below. The song is taken from the band’s eighth full-length album, “Holy Hell”, which will be released on November 9 via Epitaph Records.

“Holy Hell” marks the band’s first release since the untimely passing of Tom SearleARCHITECTS‘ founding guitarist, principal songwriter and twin brother to drummer DanTomdied in 2016 following a three-year battle with skin cancer.

Dan said: “In those first months after Tom‘s death, I didn’t deal with it at all and I felt so unhappy and anxious. I’d ignored it and just tried to cope. But I knew that at some point, I had to learn from it.”

“It’s at times like that you ask yourself, What is left?'” adds vocalist Sam Carter. “As a group of friends, we had to find something.”

“Ultimately, there were two choices,” Dan says. “Feel sorry for yourself and believe the world to be a horrible place and let it defeat you. Or let it inspire us to live the life that Tom would have wanted us to live. I was very worried about people taking away a despondent message from the album. I felt a level of responsibility to provide a light at the end of the tunnel for people who are going through terrible experiences.

Finding a way forward, the band spent six months from the fall of 2017 through the spring of this year recording what would become the 11-song album, with Dan and guitar player Josh Middleton handling production.

“For me, broadly speaking, ‘Holy Hell’ is about pain: the way we process it, cope with it, and live with it,” Dan offers. “There is value in pain. It’s where we learn, it’s where we grow.”

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Architects – “Royal Beggars”

Architects have shared mighty new track ‘Royal Beggars’ – tune in now. The metal group will release new album ‘Holy Hell’ on November 9th, their first since the untimely passing of Tom Searle.

“In those first months after Tom’s death, I didn’t deal with it at all and I felt so unhappy and anxious,” brother and band mate Dan Searle explains. “I’d ignored it and just tried to cope. But I knew that at some point, I had to learn from it.”

Those feelings linger on the new album, with new song ‘Royal Beggars’ appearing online now. Anger, regret, and sorrow function on ‘Royal Beggars’, but there’s also a shared commitment to a common purpose, a sense of righteous energy.

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Jevon – Paranoia (Live) | Vevo DSCVR

The work rate is undeniable, and UK rising star, Jevon, is back with more content for us as he delivers a brand new music video for his popular single ‘Paranoia’.

The London based talent has been injecting the scene with some dope material, and with ‘Paranoia’ proving to be a hit with the fans it was only right that he teamed up with Ebeneza Blanche who directs this epic production.

Don’t sleep on this one, and be sure to get yourself familiar with Jevon as he prepares to take the game by storm!Jevon has followed up the release of his single “Paranoia” by releasing a sick set of visuals for the track.

As well as being a cold spitter, Jevon is nice with the vocals too and on “Paranoia”, the artist showcases the latter on a jaunty but laid-back instrumental. The video for the single is bright and colourful and ends with a scene showing Jevon being stopped and arrested by the police.

 

 

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Grace Carter – Silence (Live) | Vevo DSCVR

The Brighton-raised singer-songwriter’s arresting, piano-led pop exists on a sliding scale between strength and vulnerability, each track hinged on the 20-year-old’s robust and emotionally bracing vocals.

Carter started making music when she was 13 after her stepfather, also a musician, gave her a guitar and encouraged her to start writing. A self-professed “angry child”, music allowed her to express her frustration and feelings of confusion growing up with her single mother. Now, though, her songwriting has dual ambitions: in addition to exploring her own feelings she wants to help others express themselves emotionally.

Thankfully, Carter succeeds in terms of relatability, her music exposing the universality of emotions as they veer from lovelorn to irate. Debut single Silence boils with exasperation at ineffectual communication. Likewise, her debut EP, Saving Grace, is a fervent meditation on life, family and heartache. Ashes, produced by frequent Beyoncé collaborator Mike Dean, creaks with longing and pin-sharp R&B beats, and Saving Grace throbs with reverence for the singer’s mother. Grace Carter’s music isn’t rewriting the rules; it’s so good it doesn’t have to.

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